WHAT IS THE PELOTON HALEAKALA CLIMB RIDE?
The Haleakala Climb Ride is five one-hour long classes designed for the Peloton (aka The Bike That Goes Nowhere) that, when strung together, replicate the experience of riding up the Haleakala volcano in Hawaii. It's pretty much constant climbing, with a pit stop every hour for a stretch and a banana. The classes are coached by world-champion track cyclist Christine D'Ercole.

FIVE HOURS, BACK-TO-BACK? YIKES. SO THERE'S TRAINING INVOLVED?
Oh yes. If, like me, you've never done any sort of endurance event and are 'fit' in only the most casual of ways, training is essential. There is an 11-week programme, building both saddle-time and mental endurance. Before starting this programme, the longest ride I'd ever done was 90 minutes and I HATED IT. So of course doing the Haleakala challenge was the natural choice for me when I was looking for a fundraising challenge. 😬

SO, WHEN IS THE ACTUAL RIDE HAPPENING?
I'm training to do the ride on 20th November 2021, along with other riders across the UK and US who are part of the #CDEEnduranceRiders group on Peloton. As I work towards that deadline, I need motivation. And by motivation, I mean DONATIONS. If you want to know more about why I'm doing this, read on.

MORE ABOUT PETER
11-year-old Peter is a keen gamer and loves all things Lego and playing Minecraft. He enjoys spending time cycling, swimming and crafting, especially drawing and cross-stitching and his favourite animal is a rabbit!

On New Year's Eve 2018, after complaining of backache and tingles in one leg it was confirmed that Peter had a growth in his thorax that was pressing on his spinal cord, causing a spinal cord injury. After emergency surgery, his spinal cord injury did not make the immediate recovery that was hoped for, leaving him with no movement or sensation in his lower body. Days after the surgery his parents were given the devastating news that the growth in his thorax was neuroblastoma.

After enduring intense frontline treatment, Peter was no evidence of disease in February 2020. Just 6 months later, in August 2020, after noticing a lump on his skull, parents Mandy and Martin were told that Peter had sadly relapsed with the disease spreading throughout his body.

The family have decided to start fundraising for further treatment either to get Peter back into remission or to try and keep the cancer away if his treatment goes to plan. This could cost hundreds of thousands of pounds. Rachael Dunlop